Page Loading... please wait!


This message not going away?
Ensure Javascript is on and click the box
Jul 20, 2017 - 03:41 PM  
RunCoach  
 

Fully Customized Plan

index.php?module=htmlpages&func=display&pid=31

Who's Online

There are 48 unlogged users and 0 registered users online.

You can log-in or register for a user account here.

Mailing List

Regular advice on running and RunCoach

E-mail address

Search Site


Past Articles

Older articles

Topic: Research

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

<   123456789101112131415   >

Do You Really Have Tendonitis - Or Is It Tendonosis?

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, May 28, 2005 - 04:06 AM 34664 Reads
Research

Do You Really Have Tendonitis - Or Is It Tendonosis?

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

Posted: May 13, 2005
The Two Conditions Have Quite-Different Recovery Processes

Tendonitis has a tenacious grip on the sports world. At least 25 percent of athletes treated for knee problems at major sports clinics are typically diagnosed with tendonitis (1), and 40 percent of competitive tennis players are thought to suffer from some form of elbow tendonitis (2). In the world of running, as many as 30 to 50 percent of all endurance runners experience tendonitis during a typical training year (3). Tendon injuries are among the most common "overuse" injuries - maladies which occur when an athlete's body is unable to adequately repair the insults it receives during strenuous or prolonged workouts (4).





Race And Sport - The race to the swift - if the swift have the right ancestry

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 04:05 AM 4158 Reads
Research

Race And Sport - The race to the swift - if the swift have the right ancestry

Posted: May 6, 2005

Jon Entine

Let's start with a few safe predictions. All of the sprinters in the men's 100m final at the Athens Olympics in 2004 will trace their ancestry to West Africa. Almost all of the world-class throwers will be white, and mostly of Eurasian ancestry. And, except for the marathon, there will be almost no athletes of Asian ancestry appearing in Athens finals. On the other hand, elsewhere in the Games, Asians will flourish in diving, some gymnastic events, judo, and table tennis.

A peculiar but decided trend is unfolding: over the past 40 years, as equality of opportunity has steadily increased in sports, spreading to vast sections of Asia and Africa, equality of results on the playing field has actually declined. The more democracy on the playing field, the less at the finish line. On the one hand, the social and economic barriers limiting participation in sports are crumbling; on the other, the winners in many events are increasingly limited to participants from specific regions of the world.

It's not surprising that the United States would dominate peculiarly American sports such as basketball, but who can fathom the trends in world sports, such as running. Why is it that every running record from the 100m to the marathon is held by an athlete of African ancestry? Is it racist to be curious about such phenomena?





Running Economy

Posted by: pshields on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 02:01 PM 1396 Reads
Research

Running Economy

Posted: April 21, 2005

Jim Bledsoe
A brief history of the strengthening of the economy, and why it matters

If you're a runner, perhaps you want to be able to run for longer periods of time at your current race and workout paces. Perhaps you want to run faster during your competitions and training sessions. Or maybe you just want everything you do now to feel a little easier. Whatever the case, improving your running economy can be the solution to your problem: exercise physiologists tell us that upgraded economy lowers perceived effort at your current race paces and allows you to run for longer periods of time at those speeds. Better yet, enhanced economy lets you run faster than your customary competitive speeds, without feeling that the effort is any harder.





Swedish-Cured Ham Is Right Recipe For Rejuvenated Running

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, April 09, 2005 - 12:17 PM 3239 Reads
Research

Swedish-Cured Ham Is Right Recipe For Rejuvenated Running

Posted: April 8, 2005

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

Hamstring strains and injuries are common occurrences in both distance and sprint running, and exercise scientists have searched for ways to minimize the risk of hamstring problems during training and competition. Since deficiency in hamstring strength has been cited as a key risk factor for hamstring injury (1), many researchers have suggested that appropriate strengthening of the hamstring muscles would ease the risk of trouble (2). Studies carried out with animals certainly support this idea; such research clearly demonstrates that a stronger muscle can absorb more force prior to failure, compared with a weaker muscle (3). However, until now no prospective study has actually taken a look at whether a hamstring-strengthening regime would actually lower the hurt in hamstrings during an extended period of training or a competitive season.





Muscle Fibre Typing

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, April 02, 2005 - 04:01 AM 3551 Reads
Research

Muscle Fibre Typing

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

Posted: March 25, 2005

Way back in the dark days of exercise physiology, muscle cells were divided into three types: Type 1 ("slow twitch"), Type 2a ("fast twitch"), and Type 2b ("even faster twitch"). It was commonly believed that successful distance runners' muscles were biased toward Type-1 muscle cells, while highly competitive sprinters featured a disproportionate number of Type-2b fibers.

Indeed, research revealed that about 75% of the muscle cells in the thighs of good-quality long-distance runners were Type 1, while 25% were Type 2a; poor-old Type 2b was seldom seen, perhaps blasted out of the sinews by high-volume training(1). In contrast, good middle-distance runners were found to have a bit less Type-1 and a few more Type-2a cells, with some 2bs thrown in for good measure. A very typical middle-distance make-up was 64% Type 1, 32% Type 2a, and 4% Type 2b, for example (2). Meanwhile, successful sprinters tended to check in with approximately 30% Type-1, 50% Type-2a, and 20% Type-2-b fibers (3).





Heredity, Genes And Sports Performance

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 05:36 AM 1537 Reads
Research

Heredity, Genes And Sports Performance

March 14, 2005

Dad, mum and you - how much do your genes really influence your performances?

When Nick's friends asked him to take part in a casual Saturday afternoon game of soccer, he didn't realize that kicking a ball around on a muddy field would change his life. But as he chased after that damned ball, while his leg muscles cried out in pain and his lungs heaved like circus tents in a storm, Nick realized that his body had gone all to hell - after just a few short years of scoffing up thick slices of Yorkshire pudding and slugging down pints of ale each night after work.

In the locker room after the game, Nick peered at his paunch, glared at his lardy shoulders, stole quick glances at his varicosed legs, and decided that maybe it was time to .... well .... do something. He wasn't sure exactly WHAT to do, and he wondered whether his preoccupation with his flabby belly was little more than bathos in the bathhouse, but gradually he developed a firm resolve to 'shape up'. By the next evening, he had purchased a nifty set of running shoes.





The v VO2max Test: Is It Reliable?

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 04:28 AM 2269 Reads
Research

The v VO2max Test: Is It Reliable?

Posted: March 10, 2005

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

v VO2max, the minimal running speed which elicits VO2max (the maximal rate of oxygen consumption), is an excellent predictor of relative running performance for both elite (1) and non-elite (2) runners. Line up 10 runners according to their vVO2max, from fastest to slowest, and in most cases you will have also lined them up according to their finishing places in distance races, from #1 to #10.

As I have pointed out frequently in the pages of Running Research News, vVO2max can also be used effectively to monitor changes in fitness over the course of a training year, to predict race times in events ranging from 800 meters all the way to the marathon, and to set paces for specific workouts. Numerous methods are available for the direct determination of vVO2max on a laboratory treadmill or on the track, but all of them involve rather elaborate - and expensive - procedures and are thus out of the reach of many coaches and runners.





Taking A Break - Without Breaking Up Your Hard-Earned Fitness

Posted by: pshields on Friday, February 25, 2005 - 04:06 AM 3714 Reads
Research

Taking A Break - Without Breaking Up Your Hard-Earned Fitness

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

Posted: February 18, 2005

You need a break. You can't expect your body and mind to stand up to 12 months of nearly constant training - and then immediately embark on another year of hard work. Each year of your training life should feature at least one major break designed to enhance mental and physical recovery. Without such a peaceful pause from strenuous training, the risks of injury and overtraining in a subsequent year are likely to increase.

However, it is unclear how long this substantial break should be. Some runners (including many of the top Kenyans) favor a three- to four-week respite from training, but research suggests that such lay-offs are associated with significant drops in fitness. For example, one scientific study detected a 7-percent drop in maximal aerobic capacity in athletes who did not train for three weeks (1). For a 10-K runner averaging about 40 minutes for the race, this drop-off would add about two to three minutes to finishing time.





Vitamin E, protein especially valuable to a runner's diet

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, February 17, 2005 - 02:24 AM 2169 Reads
Research

Vitamin E, protein especially valuable to a runner's diet

By Joe Rominiecki

Feb 15, 2005
Researchers in Oregon examined the benefits of vitamin E supplements for runners in a 50-kilometer (31 mile) ultramarathon in Corvallis.

While veteran runners and ambitious joggers toil through the winter months as they prepare for the spring marathon season, two recent studies suggest that certain nutrients - vitamin E and protein, namely - can bolster the body's health during times of demanding exercise.

Researchers in Oregon examined the benefits of vitamin E supplements for runners in a 50-kilometer (31 mile) ultramarathon in Corvallis. Their study found that runners taking vitamin E did not experience the usual increase in lipid oxidation - a kind of damage that can weaken cells and cause long-term cardiovascular problems - that results from extreme exercise.





Printer-friendly page

Does Stretching Cut Your Risk Of Getting Hurt - Or Extend It?

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, February 10, 2005 - 04:18 AM 1921 Reads
Research

Does Stretching Cut Your Risk Of Getting Hurt - Or Extend It?

Posted: February 4, 2005

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

"Warming up" before workouts and competitions is an almost universal practice, and athletes and coaches generally believe that good warm-ups decrease the risk of injury and increase the ability to perform at a high level.
The warm-ups performed by many athletes contain three key components:
(A) Continuous, relatively low-intensity activity designed to increase muscle temperature and activate the cardiovascular system,
(B) "Rehearsal" of the activity which is about to be performed, including high-intensity actions, in order to prepare the neuromuscular system for the challenges it is about to face, and
(C) "Stretching" exercises, especially for the muscles which will play a key role in the ensuing activity. It is often believed that such stretching increases range-of-motion at joints, relaxes muscles, and decreases stiffness in muscles and tendons, thereby reducing the risk of injury during the subsequent workout or competition (1).
As you can see, stretching activities are thought to represent the key portion of a warm-up which limits the possibility of getting injured. But does stretching during a warm-up really cut an athlete's chances of getting hurt? To find out, researchers from the Kapooka Health Centre, the University of Sydney, and Charles Sturt University in Australia recently examined the effects of pre-exercise stretching on lower-limb injury over 11 weeks of training in 1538 (!) subjects ranging in age from 17 to 35 (2). This study was carried out with a particularly apt study group: Army recruits undergoing basic training (contact the lead researcher - Rodney Peter Pope - at Rodney.Pope.69210450@army.defence.gov.au). Although army recruits are not necessarily elite athletes, they do undertake a rigidly controlled and strenuous program of exercise during basic training, and they also sustain a high frequency of lower-limb injury (3). Thus, if stretching is really beneficial as an injury-preventer, one would expect to see its effects in a large group of military-service signees.





<   123456789101112131415   >


All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest 2008 by Online Sports Coaching
This web site was made with PostNuke, a web portal system written in PHP. PostNuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
You can syndicate our news using the file backend.php