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Topic: Research

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Posted by: pshields on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 04:22 AM 14823 Reads
Research




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The Truth About Stretching

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 10:54 AM 1451 Reads
Research

The Truth About Stretching

By Phil Campbell, (M.S., M.A., FACHE) author of Ready, Set, Go! Synergy Fitness

Posted: July 20, 2005

A three year old study about stretching is being cited in many articles today, and the conclusions reached by some writers may be harmful to your muscle, ligaments and joints.

Is stretching before exercise harmful? Stretching before fitness training and athletic training is being made out to be a time-waster, not needed, and even harmful. This is not true. In fact, there's a recent study that evaluates all the research on stretching, and the study concludes:

"Due to the paucity (small number), heterogeneity (dissimilar study subjects) and poor quality of the available studies no definitive conclusions can be drawn as to the value of stretching for reducing the risk of exercise-related injury." (The efficacy of stretching for prevention of exercise-related injury: a systematic review of the literature, 2003, Weldon)

Essentially, the researchers are telling us that there are not enough quality studies to draw conclusions about this issue.





How Strength And Plyometric Training Can Boost Endurance Running Performance

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 04:07 AM 3757 Reads
Research




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Chinese Nutrition - Can Western Athletes Learn Anything?

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, July 20, 2005 - 02:16 PM 1537 Reads
Research




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Fighting Fiber Fall-Offs

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, July 10, 2005 - 05:32 AM 1494 Reads
Research

Fighting Fiber Fall-Offs

July 9, 2005

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

VO2max (maximal aerobic capacity) is a very poor predictor of performance among athletes of fairly similar ability levels. For example, if you measured the VO2max of all female runners in the world who can run the 10K in less than 35 minutes, you would find a weak correlation between the VO2max readings you obtained and actual 10-K performance times.

On the other hand, rises and falls in VO2max can play a strong role in determining your individual performance capacity. If you are fortunate enough to elevate your VO2max from 52 to 60 ml kg-1 min-1, for example, you can reasonably expect a major improvement in your 5-K, 10-K, and marathon times ' as long as you have not slaughtered your running economy and terrorized your lactate threshold in the process.





Are Norwegian Hams As Well-Preserved As Swedish Ones?

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, June 23, 2005 - 04:05 AM 1727 Reads
Research

Are Norwegian Hams As Well-Preserved As Swedish Ones?

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

June 12, 2005

In a recent issue of Running Research News, I described some special Swedish exercises for curing hamstring ills ("Swedish-Cured Hams Are Right for Runners," Volume 19-8 (October), pp. 1-4, 2003; http://www.rrnews.com). Now, Norwegian researchers are getting into the hamstring act with a unique and extremely effective exercise which expands hamstring strength greatly and - unlike the Swedish effort - requires no special equipment to perform.

In the new Norwegian research, Roald Bahr and four colleagues from the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center at the Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education and the Stabaek Clinic in Bekkestua, Norway worked with 22 competitive soccer players who were from the first-division national club Stabaek Fotball (10 athletes) and also from some second- through fourth-division teams (12 players). At the beginning of the study, all athletes underwent basic tests of hamstring flexibility and strength, as well as quadriceps-muscle forcefulness (1). None of the 22 players were suffering from prior hamstring strains which had not been fully resolved by the start of the study.





How Does Explosive Training Change Your Leg Muscles?

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, June 21, 2005 - 04:13 AM 2256 Reads
Research

How Does Explosive Training Change Your Leg Muscles?

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

June 17, 2005

Our skeletal muscles are highly plastic tissues which respond rapidly to the things we do during training. That being the case, what specific changes occur in our muscle cells when we engage in explosive training? Does an understanding of explosive-training-related muscle alterations help us plan more-effective explosive workouts?

To find out, Dr. Heikki Kyrolainen and his colleagues at the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland, Appalachian State University in North Carolina, and the Copenhagen Muscle Research Center in Denmark recently studied the leg muscles of 13 athletes as they carried out explosive training, along with 10 individuals who served as controls (1). The subjects in both groups were young (24-25 years old) and relatively lean (9- to 11-percent body fat), and had not participated in any systematic power training prior to the study.





Management of Heatstroke and Heat Exhaustion

Posted by: pshields on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 01:50 AM 1882 Reads
Research

Management of Heatstroke and Heat Exhaustion

JAMES L. GLAZER, M.D.,

Heat exhaustion and heatstroke are part of a continuum of heat- related illness. Both are common and preventable conditions affecting diverse patients. Recent research has identified a cascade of inflammatory pathologic events that begins with mild heat exhaustion and, if uninterrupted, can lead eventually to multiorgan failure and death. Heat exhaustion is characterized by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, headache, and nausea. Treatment involves monitoring the patient in a cool, shady environment and ensuring adequate hydration. Untreated heat exhaustion can progress to heatstroke, a much more serious illness involving central nervous system dysfunction such as delirium and coma. Other systemic effects, including rhabdomyolysis, hepatic failure, arrhythmias, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and even death, are not uncommon. Prompt recognition and immediate cooling through evaporation or full-body ice-water immersion are crucial. Physicians also must monitor electrolyte abnormalities, be alert to signs of renal or hepatic failure, and replace fluids in patients with heatstroke. Most experts believe that physicians and public health officials should focus greater attention on prevention. Programs involving identification of vulnerable individuals, dissemination of information about dangerous heat waves, and use of heat shelters may help prevent heat-related illness. These preventive measures, when paired with astute recognition of the early signs of heat-related illness, can allow physicians in the ambulatory setting to avert much of the morbidity and mortality associated with heat exhaustion and heatstroke. (Am Fam Physician 2005;71:2133-40, 2141-2. Copyright 2005 American Academy of Family Physicians.)





Can Endurance Runners Be Vegetarians?

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, June 07, 2005 - 04:29 AM 5172 Reads
Research

Can Endurance Runners Be Vegetarians?

May 28, 2005

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

Many meat-eating athletes wonder whether a switch to a vegetarian diet might provide a performance boost, and there are logical reasons for such thinking. First, vegetarian diets tend to be high-carbohydrate regimens, which should lead to optimal glycogen storage in muscles. At the lofty intensities required for high-level training and serious competition, carbohydrate is the primary source of energy; when muscle-carbohydrate (glycogen) levels are too low, athletes experience fatigue and tend to perform poorly (1). Thus, a vegetarian diet may function as an "insurance policy" against insipid intramuscular carbohydrate storage and underachievement in races.





A Stitch In Time - How To Prevent Stomach Cramps From Ruining

Posted by: pshields on Monday, May 30, 2005 - 04:23 AM 16352 Reads
Research

A Stitch In Time - How To Prevent "Stomach" Cramps From Ruining Your Race

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

Posted: May 20, 2005

Runners who are prone to pains in their upper-abdominal areas (aka "stitches") usually develop the problems during the latter halves of their races, and they seldom have to endure stitch suffering during workouts, even when the sessions are prolonged and taxing. Why is this so, and what can you do to decrease your risk of developing a race-ruining stitch?

The fact that stitches prefer the late stages of competitions means that the disorders tend to occur when the respiratory system is stressed to its maximal level. In addition, since the pains appear in the upper-abdominal area, the key muscle of breathing - the diaphragm - must be involved in the often-agonizing discomfort. The diaphragm, which spreads over the top of the abdominal cavity like a dome-shaped hood, is producing its greatest-possible force near the end of a race, hoping to increase the rate at which oxygen is dragged into the lungs (and therefore enters the blood). At the same time, the diaphragm is experiencing its greatest-possible fatigue.





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