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Topic: Research

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Explosive-strength training improves 5-km running time by improving running econ

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, July 24, 2003 - 04:25 AM 2000 Reads
Research

Explosive-strength training improves 5-km running time by improving running economy and muscle power.

Paavolainen L, Hakkinen K, Hamalainen I, Nummela A, Rusko H.

Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2003 Aug;13(4):272.
KIHU-Research Institute for Olympic Sports, University of Jyvaskyla, SF-40700 Jyvaskyla, Finland.

To investigate the effects of simultaneous explosive-strength and endurance training on physical performance characteristics, 10 experimental (E) and eight control (C) endurance athletes trained for 9 weeks.



Note: Note: Another study which shows the benefits of explosive strength training on running economy:- Paul

A prospective study of running injuries

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, July 02, 2003 - 04:03 AM 2007 Reads
Research

A prospective study of running injuries: the Vancouver Sun Run "In Training" clinics.

Taunton JE, Ryan MB, Clement DB, McKenzie DC, Lloyd-Smith DR, Zumbo BD.

Br J Sports Med. 2003 Jun;37(3):239-44.

Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

OBJECTIVES: Seventeen running training clinics were investigated to determine the number of injuries that occur in a running programme designed to minimise the injury rate for athletes training for a 10 km race. The relative contributions of factors associated with injury were also reported.



Note: Age, weight, days running per week, and running shoe age are all associated with increased chance of injury.:- Paul

Fat oxidation rates are higher during running compared with cycling

Posted by: pshields on Monday, June 30, 2003 - 04:05 AM 2105 Reads
Research

Fat oxidation rates are higher during running compared with cycling over a wide range of intensities.

Achten J, Venables MC, Jeukendrup AE.

Metabolism. 2003 Jun;52(6):747-52

The aim of the present study was to compare the intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation (Fat(max)) determined using a cycle-ergometer and a treadmill-based protocol.



Note: Running/walking burns more fat than cycling.:- Paul

The influence of a 6.5% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution on performance

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, June 28, 2003 - 04:09 AM 1869 Reads
Research

The influence of a 6.5% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution on performance of prolonged intermittent high-intensity running at 30 degrees C.

Morris JG, Nevill ME, Thompson D, Collie J, Williams C.

J Sports Sci. 2003 May;21(5):371-81.

Institute of Youth Sport and Human Muscle Metabolism Research Group, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK. j.g.morris@lboro.ac.uk

Nine male student games players consumed either flavoured water (0.1 g carbohydrate, Na+ 6 mmol x l(-1)), a solution containing 6.5% carbohydrate-electrolytes (6.5 g carbohydrate, Na+ 21 mmol x l(-1)) or a taste placebo (Na+ 2 mmol x l(-1)) during an intermittent shuttle test performed on three separate occasions at an ambient temperature of 30 degrees C (dry bulb).



Note: For exericise time up to an hour and 15 mins doing intermittent running (eg a football game) it would seem that carbohydrate replacement is not needed.:- Paul

British running performances in the eighteenth century

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, June 26, 2003 - 04:26 AM 1850 Reads
Research

British running performances in the eighteenth century.

Radford PF, Ward-Smith AJ.

J Sports Sci. 2003 May;21(5):429-38

Department of Sport Science, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH, UK. peter.radford@brunel.ac.uk

Our aims were to improve our understanding of human performance before 1850 and to put nineteenth- and twentieth-century performances into a broader historical context.



Note: Performance in the twentieth century seems better than previous centuries.:- Paul

Effects of increased intensity of intermittent training in runners with differin

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 - 04:09 AM 1721 Reads
Research

Effects of increased intensity of intermittent training in runners with differing VO2 kinetics.

Millet GP, Libicz S, Borrani F, Fattori P, Bignet F, Candau R.

Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003 Jun 13

Faculte des Sciences du Sport, 700 Avenue du pic Saint Loup, Montpellier, France.

The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that athletes having a slower oxygen uptake ( VO2) kinetics would benefit more, in terms of time spent near VO2max, from an increase in the intensity of an intermittent running training (IT).



Note: It would seeem that people who are slower to reach their VO2max benefit from interval training of greater intensity than others who are quick to reach it.:- Paul

Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - 05:47 AM 2286 Reads
Research

Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation.

Achten J, Gleeson M, Jeukendrup AE.

Human Performance Laboratory, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Jan;34(1):92-7.

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop a test protocol to determine the exercise intensity at which fat oxidation rate is maximal (Fat(max)).



Note: It seems that at fat buring is quite high over a wide range of intensities. It drops off quite marketly over a certain point. Other studies have shown this to be near your anaerobic threshold:- Paul

Effect of magnetic therapy on selected physical performances

Posted by: pshields on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 04:16 AM 2053 Reads
Research

Effect of magnetic therapy on selected physical performances.

Schall DM, Ishee JH, Titlow LW.

Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, Arkansas 72035.

J Strength Cond Res 2003 May;17(2):299-302

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of magnetic therapy in the form of shoe insoles on vertical jump, bench squat, 40-yd dash, and a soccer-specific fitness test performance.



Note: It seems magnetic therapy does not improve performance:- Paul

The impact of resistance training on distance running performance

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, June 05, 2003 - 04:03 AM 1927 Reads
Research

The impact of resistance training on distance running performance.

Jung A.

Department of Kinesiology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA.

Sports Med 2003;33(7):539-52

Traditionally, distance running performance was thought to be determined by several characteristics, including maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), lactate threshold (LT), and running economy. Improvements in these areas are primarily achieved through endurance training. Recently, however, it has been shown that anaerobic factors may also play an important role in distance running performance.



Note: Another study showing that resistance training (strength) has a positive impact on running economy:- Paul

Decline in masters track and field performance with age

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 04:22 AM 1895 Reads
Research

Percentage decline in masters superathlete track and field performance with aging.

Baker AB, Tang YQ, Turner MJ.

Exp Aging Res 2003 Jan-Mar;29(1):47-65

Department of Anaesthetics, University of Sydney, Royal Prince Albert Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. bbaker@mail.usyd.edu.au

Masters athletic records in track and field events, published in September 1999, were analyzed to evaluate the percentage decline in maximum physiological performance with increasing age.



Note: 75% of running performance occurs around the early sixties :- Paul

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