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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Why Endurance Training Lacks Staying Power

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 04:50 AM 1152 Reads
Training

Why Endurance Training Lacks Staying Power

Posted: February 20, 2006

by Alwyn Cosgrove

The biggest mistake endurance athletes make in their training program is falling into the trap that their sport is about who can go the longest. It's not. It's STILL about who can go the fastest. They give medals for the first athlete to cross the 5K / 10K / marathon / ultra marathon finish line - not the athlete who crosses it and can keep on going. There's a reason it's 26 miles and 385 yards. There's an END point. And whoever gets there the fastest will be the winner.

Traditional endurance training programs reflect that fallacy. They are based around a lot of mileage to increase your endurance.

As a sports scientist - let me break this down. Endurance in my field - is the ability to maintain a constant sub maximal output - to maintain a lower percentage of your max output. In other words - your ability to run/bike/swim slower than you are able to, for longer periods of time.





Nutrition: Race Day Nutritional Bliss

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 04:04 AM 1473 Reads
Training

Nutrition: Race Day Nutritional Bliss

By: Kim Mueller, MS, RD, SDTC Sports Nutritionist

Posted: February 14, 2006

How many of you have been extremely disgruntled after a less-than-optimal race day performance? I think we have all been there before. While sub par performances are inevitable from time to time, it is really disheartening when you put many months of training in only to have your race day performance be compromised due to ignorance with nutrition. As a sports nutritionist and a fellow endurance athlete, I have come across pretty much every ugly nutritional scenario possible. Below, I provide some insight on how you can avoid these disasters and prepare your body for race day nutritional bliss.





Coach's book pushes two-phase training

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, February 18, 2006 - 05:04 AM 1604 Reads
Training

Coach's book pushes two-phase training

February 15, 2006

BY DOUG KURTIS
Coach, author Bill Squires

Bill Squires is easily described as a coach with character and a long list of successes. Next week, he will speak at five Michigan running stores to promote his new book, "Speed With Endurance," developed with another coach, Bruce Lehane.

Squires taught and coached at Boston College, but he is best known for the athletes he helped at the Greater Boston Track Club. They include some of America's greatest marathoners -- Bill Rodgers, Alberto Salazar, Dick Beardsley and Greg Meyer.

"Speed With Endurance" highlights a comprehensive system of training and an integrated process of combining workouts to maximize a runner's ability.





The Cross Training Benefits of Cycling, Swimming and Aqua Jogging!

Posted by: pshields on Friday, February 17, 2006 - 07:14 AM 3343 Reads
Training

The Cross Training Benefits of Cycling, Swimming and Aqua Jogging!

February 16, 2006

The following activities are great cross-training options that when included into your routine will enhance overall training. Provided are the cross-training benefits for cycling, swimming and aqua jogging: Recent Entries

Cycling works running related muscle groups such as the quadriceps and shins, both of which don't develop as rapidly as the calf muscles and hamstrings. Cycling also strengthens the connective tissue of the knee, hip and ankle regions thus reducing the risk of injury. After a stressful run, cycling also loosens fatigued leg muscles. Since it's much more difficult to run after cycling, run first before getting on a bike.





The Language Of Running

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 04:34 AM 886 Reads
Training

The Language Of Running

By Owen Anderson

Posted: February 6, 2006

Our workouts should have a specific purpose. Simply training very hard and then hoping for the best is seldom the best way to achieve optimal performances.

For example, we conduct intervals at vVO2max when we want to upgrade vVO2max itself. We use hard hill running to boost economy, speed at lactate threshold, fatigue-resistance, and muscle-buffer capacity.

We call on circuit workouts to advance lactate threshold, improve whole-body strength, and enhance economy.

Our running-specific strengthening sessions bolster running economy and fatigue-resistance, and our explosive workouts knock power and vVO2max upward.

When these kinds of workouts are combined in a productive way in an overall training program, important performance variables are optimized, and fitness and competitive ability soar. Each type of workout has a specific role to play in the push toward higher fitness.





Nutrition: Staving Off Muscle Soreness--Nutritional Strategies that Work

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 04:04 AM 3076 Reads
Training

Nutrition: Staving Off Muscle Soreness--Nutritional Strategies that Work

By: Kim Mueller, MS, RD, SDTC Sports Nutritionist

February 5, 2006

As you fight for survival on your last interval or final mile of long marathon training run, you may wonder if your body will ever fully recover from the beating of the workout. While muscular fatigue and soreness are inevitable after intense workouts and thus the emphasized importance of recovery days by coaches, cutting edge scientific research has shown that use of certain nutritional strategies prior to, during, and after training can minimize muscle damage and aid quick muscle recovery, ultimately helping to rejuvenate your muscles for peak performance at your next workout. Here's the latest scoop.





Persistence pays for runners

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 04:12 AM 1000 Reads
Training

Persistence pays for runners

By Sam Hammontree

February 6, 2006

The New Year has arrived and already we are more than six weeks into it. Most of us set New Year's resolutions -- and the most popular of those resolutions revolve around our health.

But, as the days and weeks of 2006 drift away, so does the motivation for working out and keeping a good physical fitness routine.

It's very easy to start a fitness program (anyone can start one), however the hardest part is staying the course.

Staying motivated is the most challenging part of staying fit. Quitting is easy, especially when boredom sets in or results come too slowly. But persistence does pay off with rewards that can only be reaped by "keeping on, keeping on."

Many experts agree that it takes about 6 weeks to establish a good habit, or to get into a routine that seems normal and part of everyday life. If you started a new fitness regimen at the turn of the New Year, you are now approaching a very important stage of your new routine. So, what will it be? Give up, or continue on?





Training for the Half-Marathon: February

Posted by: pshields on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 04:19 AM 1102 Reads
Training




10K TRAINING TIPS

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, February 12, 2006 - 04:06 AM 1207 Reads
Training

10K TRAINING TIPS

Eileen Jacobs

Feb 8, 2006

If you're training for the April 1 Ukrop's Monument Avenue 10k, this week's local running expert has tips to help you do your best.

Thom Suddeth is the owner of the RoadRunner Running Store in Carytown. Having been a competitive runner himself, he also trains elite athletes.

Training

To get the most bang for your buck, I recommend hill work once a week as the best workout in training. You're utilizing speed, endurance and biomechanics.

Before you start, warm up by jogging for about 15 to 20 minutes. The better the warm-up, the better the workout.





New programs help you prep for marathons in less time

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, February 11, 2006 - 04:06 AM 1181 Reads
Training

New programs help you prep for marathons in less time

February 07, 2006

By Tara Parker-Pope

Training for a marathon traditionally takes a big time commitment, requiring runners to pound the pavement an hour or more each day in the months before a race.

But an increasingly popular way to train defies conventional wisdom, promising marathoners that they can get into shape by running as little as three days a week.

The less-is-more method won't transform you into an Olympic athlete. But proponents say it can help even beginners prepare for the grueling 26.2-mile race with less risk of injury, because the body has more time to recover between runs. Many experienced runners actually boast of personal bests after adopting a three-day running program.

"Most people have this perception that you have to be out there running for an hour and a half every day," says Jeff Galloway, a former Olympian who has devised a three-day program. "But you don't have to give up your career and family to run a marathon."





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