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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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I've learned the efficient way of running my routes

Posted by: pshields on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 08:37 AM 1304 Reads
Training

I've learned the efficient way of running my routes

Bruce Deaton

2nd Mar 2006

I have always had a thing for efficiency.

At school, before I walk out of my office, I usually carry three or four items to deliver at the same time and cover a route that is the most efficient. I do the same thing usually around the house or when having to run an errand in my car and even when I run.

While running I am not necessarily covering a course based upon efficiency, but trying to maintain a style that is most efficient and most relaxing, which pays huge dividends over those long distances. Two things that help contribute to running efficiency for me are foot cadence and arm swing. Foot cadence is the measure of how many strikes on the ground one foot makes in one minute.





Runners need to lift weights with their legs

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 04:04 AM 3529 Reads
Training

Runners need to lift weights with their legs

SHANNON SIMMONS

February 27, 2006

Question: I am a long-distance runner and usually race in 15K's and half-marathons. Do I still need to lift weights with my legs if they get so much exercise with my cardiovascular training?

Answer: Even though it might feel and look like your legs are getting adequate exercise and strengthening from your cardiovascular exercise, it still would benefit you to lift weights with your legs.





up, up and away

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 04:01 AM 2206 Reads
Training

up, up and away

February 26, 2006

There's a new balance trainer on the scene, Bosu, and Damien Kelly has devised a workout that puts it centre stage. I'll let you in on a little secret. Balance training may be the most effective form of training ever invented. The Bosu balance trainer, a strange name, I know, is the newest kid on the block. Bosu stands for both sides up and, as the latest incarnation of the super successful Swiss ball, it really is a nifty little toy to add to your exercise equipment arsenal. Ken Baldwin, director of QPEC Fitness Solutions, is one of Australia's leading experts on the Bosu. "The beauty of the Bosu is that it trains all components of fitness, including strength, cardio, flexibility and sports power. It's also great for injury rehabilitation," he says. So why does adding a balance component enhance your workout? "Balance enables your muscles to become smarter by forcing a quicker reaction time and gives you a total muscle contraction," says Baldwin. Another trait of the Bosu is its versatility. "The biggest benefit is that regardless of your skill level you can get benefits. I've used them with elite skiers, power lifters, runners, sprinters and sports people of any standard. Kids love them as they're heaps of fun. They suit the elderly too, as they're closer to the ground, which makes them much easier to use," he says.





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Marathon Final Countdown - Pacing the race to reserve energy

Posted by: pshields on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 04:34 AM 1577 Reads
Training

Marathon Final Countdown - Pacing the race to reserve energy

BMW Malta Marathon - March 5

by John Walsh

Isn't it funny how, way back in October when you began thinking about training to take part in the BMW Malta Marathon, you thought you had lots of time and then, before you know it, there's only one week to go.

I guess, if many of us did not have a race date to aim for, we'd keep thinking, I'm not quite ready, I need another week or two of good training. And then two weeks later; no, I'm still not ready.

Fortunately, there's nothing like a race deadline to focus the mind.

Ready or not, the race is upon you. You only had to have had a slight cold or injury this winter to put you off training for a week or two, to think that you really could do with a bit more training, and that race day has dawned just a little bit too soon for you to do your absolute best.

This helps us to realise that the Olympics, or any other big events, are not necessarily won by the best athlete, but by the one who is best prepared on that particular day.





Home fitness goes digital

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, February 26, 2006 - 04:10 AM 1539 Reads
Training

Home fitness goes digital

Posted 2/23/2006

Kim Komando

Have you tossed your New Year's resolution of exercising more and getting fit? Perhaps all you need is a little motivation. Here's where your home computer can help.

Fitness programs combined with an Internet connection add fun and competition into your workouts. Take rowing, for instance. When you're indoors, the scenery never changes.





Experts urge runners to heed their bodies' needs

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, February 25, 2006 - 08:16 AM 1431 Reads
Training

Experts urge runners to heed their bodies' needs

By Barb Berggoetz

Fueling a workout takes thought and planning, but fitness experts say it will pay off.

General recommendations for athletes and runners from the American College of Sports Medicine and American Dietetic Association say carbohydrates should make up at least 60 percent of their calories; fats, 25 percent; and protein, 15 percent. For Matt Fitzgerald, though, 50 percent from carbohydrates is enough during training for marathons and triathlons. Fitzgerald is a 20-year runner and coach, and author of "Performance Nutrition for Runners" (Rodale Books, $14.95). He said diets of top Kenyan runners include as much as 70 percent carbohydrates. Some runners do best with high-carbohydrate diets, while others prefer more moderate levels, said Fitzgerald, of northern California. If runners notice they're sluggish, he suggests writing down what they eat and when, assessing how they perform and adjusting their diet. While the reason isn't always diet-related, he said steps such as not skipping breakfast, eating more fruits and veggies, minimizing processed foods, avoiding evening gorging and eating at times to best fuel workouts can help runners and walkers. Here's advice on eating and drinking before, during and after moderate to intense workouts:





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Definition of Speed Play (Fartlek Training)

Posted by: pshields on Friday, February 24, 2006 - 12:17 PM 6775 Reads
Training

Definition of Speed Play (Fartlek Training)

February 23, 2006

Paul Greer

Speed play is the literal translation of the swedish word Fartlek. It combines fast and slow running within a continuous run. Different times of fast running are followed by easy recovery running. Ideally, speed play is done over varied terrain, including running over hills. The length of speed bursts and recovery is generally unstructured so that the athlete gains a genuine feeling of playing with speed.





Runners, break the injury cycle

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, February 23, 2006 - 04:03 AM 1450 Reads
Training

Runners, break the injury cycle

By Amy Bertrand

Monday, Feb. 20 2006

Erika Holroyd knows a thing or two about distance running, having won the Spirit of St. Louis Marathon in 2000. She also knows a thing or two about injuries, having been hurt more times than she can count. "I've had them all," she says with a laugh. "I've had a lot of minor injuries that you can run through like shin splints, strained muscles, tendinitis, IT band pain, and then there are the more serious ones you can't run through," such as the five stress fractures she's had.





Going the Distance -- Endurance athletes must watch their diets

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - 04:04 AM 2374 Reads
Training




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Circuit, interval and cross training

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 05:03 PM 8672 Reads
Training

Circuit, interval and cross training

Feb 21, 2006

By Tina Juan Inquirer

IF YOU are bored with your workouts and feel like the fitness improvements you used to see have vanished into thin air, then you may want to try circuit, interval or cross training.

These methods are not new. They've been around a long time and, in fact, if you stick around a gym long enough, you're bound to hear about them. Here are the advantages and disadvantages:

Circuit training





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