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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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From Start to Fitness

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 02:40 PM 1508 Reads
Training

From Start to Fitness

Heart rate monitors

By Andrea Renee Wyatt,

Q: A month ago, I started wearing a monitor to keep track of my heart rate while exercising. I try to keep my heart rate within my "fatburning zone" based on the information card that came with the monitor. I don't feel like I'm working that hard keeping my heart rate within the fat-burning zone, and I'm not even sure if it SHOULD be hard. What exactly is the fat-burning zone, and how important is it in helping me to lose weight?





Training tips for young runners

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 02:04 PM 5715 Reads
Training

Training tips for young runners

Chris Swingle

June 14, 2006

When children under 15 are new at running, the key is to keep it fun and not overdo.

The 10-percent rule is a good guide. Don't increase your mileage by more than 10 percent per week. So if you can run one mile at a time (or 12 minutes straight) now, next week try 1.1 mile (or 13 minutes).

The following tips for young runners come from Coach Michael Reif of the Genesee Valley Harriers Running Club and Greater Rochester Track Club, and Brighton varsity cross-country and track Coach Nathan "Nate" Huckle, who also coaches the sixth-grade running club:





Is barefoot better?

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, June 13, 2006 - 03:19 PM 1544 Reads
Training

Is barefoot better?

www.runningbarefoot.org

Runners and athletes are always searching for the perfect shoe to improve performance and reduce injury. But some say shoes are the problem, and the best solution may be training without them.





Lactic Acid Is Not Muscles' Foe, It's Fuel

Posted by: pshields on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 09:44 AM 1253 Reads
Training

Lactic Acid Is Not Muscles' Foe, It's Fuel

By GINA KOLATA

May 16, 2006

Everyone who has even thought about exercising has heard the warnings about lactic acid. It builds up in your muscles. It is what makes your muscles burn. Its buildup is what makes your muscles tire and give out.

Coaches and personal trainers tell athletes and exercisers that they have to learn to work out at just below their "lactic threshold," that point of diminishing returns when lactic acid starts to accumulate. Some athletes even have blood tests to find their personal lactic thresholds.

But that, it turns out, is all wrong. Lactic acid is actually a fuel, not a caustic waste product. Muscles make it deliberately, producing it from glucose, and they burn it to obtain energy. The reason trained athletes can perform so hard and so long is because their intense training causes their muscles to adapt so they more readily and efficiently absorb lactic acid.





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The monitored runner

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, June 11, 2006 - 12:47 PM 1614 Reads
Training

The monitored runner

June 09, 2006

STEVE WOODWARD
New gizmos tell athletes everything from their heart rate to GPS location in a quest for efficiency

Peter Barna is a veritable throwback to the dark ages of running.

The 23-year-old Portlander rarely wears a heart-rate monitor. He shuns pedometers and accelerometers. No infrared pulse meter, calorie counter or FM radio. No global positioning system to provide elevation, latitude and longitude. Not even an iPod.

"Instead, I just listen to a song before I go running and get it stuck in my head," the distance runner says.

Nonwired runners like Barna are increasingly drifting to the back of the pack. About 47 percent of runners responding to an online poll by the Road Runners Club of America say they use electronics to pace themselves. And the variety and sophistication of electronics for runners keeps leaping forward.





Run for your life

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, June 10, 2006 - 03:16 PM 1489 Reads
Training

Run for your life

NEAL DENTON

It can be done at the track, the park, on a treadmill, a nature trail or just around the neighborhood. Running is definitely one of the most popular and best ways to get in or stay in shape.

If it is not done carefully and properly, however, running can result in a variety of injuries. Jerry and Kim McDonald are two personal trainers who have seen a host of those injuries.

Stretching cold muscles is not recommended by either trainer. Instead, Jerry McDonald says walking and gradually building up to full speed is better for running. He said that stretching can be done before the running, but only after walking. Stretching is good, however, for cooling down after running, as it brings new blood to the muscles.





Focus on Function: What Top Athletes Can Teach the Rest of Us

Posted by: pshields on Friday, June 09, 2006 - 01:32 PM 1282 Reads
Training

Focus on Function: What Top Athletes Can Teach the Rest of Us

Jun 09

Scott Jurek not only runs all-terrain races of 100 miles or more. He wins.

Pacific Northwest Ballet soloist Maria Chapman makes the difficult look beatific.

Courtney Thompson, among the land's finest volleyball players, is not satisfied.

You, most likely, are not like them. You probably never have won _ and never will _ such prestigious awards and titles or even gotten applause. Yet, when it comes to the nub of what "fit" means, the accomplished share more than you'd expect with the rest of us.

Despite what magazine-cover freaks tell you, being fit, at its core, is about function, not form. That's the focus of top athletes. Being fit means having the ability to do what you need, whatever that may be. It could be skiing without getting injured or doing your job without letting your job undo you. How about keeping weight down and cardiovascular levels high to avoid chronic disease? The bottom line is that all of us need to realize potential.





The Right Way To Hydrate For Marathons

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, June 08, 2006 - 11:18 PM 1863 Reads
Training

The Right Way To Hydrate For Marathons

June 8, 2006

1. How important is hydration to a marathon safety and performance?

Hydration status in marathon runners is dependent on the balance between sweat losses and fluid replacement and dehydration occurs when fluid losses are not adequately replaced. Sweat rates are influenced by weather conditions and running pace (i.e., pace per mile). Warm humid weather increases sweat rates and may accelerate the onset of dehydration and heat-related illnesses in runners. Keeping the body properly hydrated with the right amount of fluids improves safety and performance in a marathon by maintaining blood and cell fluid volume for cardiovascular transport and sweating. Dehydration causes marathon runners to run slower as the drop in body water decreases vascular volume with lower cardiac output and decreased muscle cell function. It is possible to ingest too much fluid, which can result in a potentially fatal condition called hyponatremia. Balancing fluid intake with sweat losses to avoid dehydration and hyponatremia is the goal. Find out what keeps you in balance; there is no standard intake rate for everyone.





Performance-Enhancing Placebos

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 08:46 AM 1298 Reads
Training

Performance-Enhancing Placebos

June 6, 2006

Sometimes you need extra kick -- for a workout, a race, to fight embezzlement charges -- and you might be tempted to try a performance-enhancing product. A new study suggests that you save your money; if anything, order a shot of self-deception instead.

The study, led by Jennifer Otto, a clinical exercise physiology graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, showed that runners clocked faster 5-K times after drinking what they thought was super-oxygenated water, but in fact was tap water.





Strength and Stability Training for Distance Runners

Posted by: pshields on Monday, June 05, 2006 - 12:07 PM 1446 Reads
Training

Strength and Stability Training for Distance Runners

By Ben Wisbey

June 5, 2006

Strength training is one of the most commonly discussed topics amongst distance runners, generating great debates with many strong opinions. Should distance runners undertake regular strength training programs?

Strength training is generally associated with hypertrophy, or the increase of muscle mass. This perception turns many runners away from ever undertaking weight training. Runners often fear bulking up, and this dictates opinions and training practices. Obviously increased muscle mass would require the runner to carry this extra weight during both training and racing, and as running does not require high force production, this extra muscle mass would be of little value in terms of performance.





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