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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Oxygenated H2O all wet - Recent study throws water on companies' claims

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, July 20, 2006 - 02:38 PM 1247 Reads
Training

Oxygenated H2O all wet - Recent study throws water on companies' claims

By ROBERTA MACINNIS

July 19, 2006,

First it was high-altitude training. Then it was nasal strips. Now comes word that oxygen-enhanced water will help you run faster.

But will it?

The answer, surprisingly, is yes, if you think it will.

That's according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse who recently conducted a study to see what would happen when runners thought they were getting a boost from "super-oxygenated" water.

Manufacturers, who sell their products under such brands as Aqua Rush and Life O2, claim it has up to 10 times as much oxygen content than regular tap water. The increased oxygen, the theory goes, is absorbed by the body and results in improved athletic performance and stamina, reduced recovery time and better mental clarity.

But earlier studies by the same researchers concluded not only that manufacturers' claims of oxygen content were inflated but also that drinking super-oxygenated water had no effect on heart rate, blood pressure or blood lactate values.





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Massage can complement training

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, July 19, 2006 - 01:45 PM 1003 Reads
Training

Massage can complement training

July 19, 2006

BY DOUG KURTIS

Marathon runners should consider massage as a regular part of their training regimen, especially when moving into high-mileage weeks.

If you are preparing for the Detroit Free Press Flagstar Bank Marathon, and you've never gone to a massage therapist, now would be a good time to look for one. Other runners are often a reliable source for finding one that might be right for you.

Trial and error is often the best way of finding a good match. Reputable therapists usually have web sites. Also, a massage therapist who isn't solving your problem should be open-minded enough to recommend someone else. Remember, you are paying the therapist to help you reach your goals.

How often you schedule a massage may depend on your time, budget or a specific event coming up.





Race to the Swift? Not Necessarily

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, July 18, 2006 - 09:18 AM 1770 Reads
Training




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Proper training can reduce cramps and soreness

Posted by: pshields on Monday, July 17, 2006 - 02:46 PM 1894 Reads
Training

Proper training can reduce cramps and soreness

By TOM KREAGER

17th July 06
Breaks, stretching, water are essential

Athletes working out in preparation for the upcoming sports seasons are bound to experience different aches and pains.

For some, it might be cramps during a workout in the hot sun. Others might wake up with soreness after a hard weightlifting session the day before.

Both are normal pains associated with working out. But both pains can be reduced with the proper training.

"It's just a matter of conditioning," said Scott Cooper, a certified athletic trainer with the Vanderbilt Orthopedic Institute. "A lot of it is getting adapted to the weather and the heat. You have to remember to keep lots of fluids in your body. But you also have to get the proper amount of rest as well as eat the right foods."





Runners' habits not really 'lazy'

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, July 16, 2006 - 03:15 PM 874 Reads
Training

Runners' habits not really 'lazy'

July 05, 2006

Looking for a parking spot is no easy task. It was 6:30 p.m., some time in January. My friends were waiting inside Newburgh's crowded Gold's Gym. I circled the parking lot five times. I passed one spot about 15 parking places from the front door - not close enough. Another space was available further away, but it was definitely too far.

The same three cars kept passing me. The drivers were probably thinking the same thing I was: work out for two hours - no problem. Walk more than 100 feet to the front door - no way!

I finally settled for a spot, farther away from the door than any of the other 10 spots I passed. The space was so small my car door hit the curb, leaving me barely enough room to squeeze out. I thought of climbing out the window, but instead sucked in my stomach and scraped my body on the edge of the door to get out.

My friends were anticipating my arrival and when I entered the gym, I was too embarrassed to tell them what took me so long. We began our workout - a six-mile run and an hour weight routine.





Overcoming barriers to fitness

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, July 15, 2006 - 02:49 PM 1142 Reads
Training




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Marathon training groups provide network of support

Posted by: pshields on Friday, July 14, 2006 - 08:55 AM 855 Reads
Training




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E-Mail From My Coach Made Me Do It

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, July 13, 2006 - 03:25 PM 937 Reads
Training




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Preparation the key for longer runs

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, July 12, 2006 - 09:52 AM 1000 Reads
Training

Preparation the key for longer runs

By Leo Babauta

Any long-distance runner knows the words that can both inspire excellence and instill fear: the long run.

As I mentioned in a previous column, many marathoners believe that the long run IS the training program for a marathon. It is certainly the core of any training program for a marathon, or any long-distance training for that matter, and it is so important that it merits a close look.

For me, the long run has been a mixed blessing -- it has allowed me to increase my stamina and endurance to levels I'd never imagined before, it has been a source of joy and peace when it has gone well, and it has been a source of pain when it hasn't gone well. Looking back on it, I think the key to whether a long run is a success or not is preparation. And I'm here to help the new runners learn from my mistakes -- there's no need for us all to repeat them.





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Training for Women Over 50

Posted by: pshields on Monday, July 10, 2006 - 03:24 PM 5322 Reads
Training

Training for Women Over 50

By: Neil L. Cook

July 10, 2006

Introduction

I am always impressed when I talk with and read about women over 50 and their running. For the past few years, I have been coaching a team of women that are all over 50. Women over 50 were for the most part, denied the opportunity to participate in sports while they were in school, both high school and college. They tell me that running has made them different, given them strength, made them part of a team, or club, and made them feel like they belong. Pushing their bodies to the limit is a wonderful feeling. Younger runners and most men have experienced that many times in their lives. But, those women that grew up before Title IX, typically were not offered that opportunity.





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