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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Personal satisfaction is a better goal than aiming to lose pounds

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, August 01, 2006 - 07:46 AM 890 Reads
Training

Personal satisfaction is a better goal than aiming to lose pounds

By Julie Deardorff

July 31st, 2006

It probably seemed like a good idea at the time: sign up for the daunting 26.2-mile Chicago Marathon to drop a few pounds or to impress your friends.

If you finish, you probably will slim down along the way. And running a marathon is an achievement worth bragging about.

Unfortunately, you're approaching it the hard way. First-time marathoners with so-called superficial motivations (such as slimming down) are more likely to drop out of training than those who run for inner glory (such as personal satisfaction), according to an Arizona State University study.





Fitness fans keep the beat

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, July 30, 2006 - 02:13 PM 1087 Reads
Training

Fitness fans keep the beat

By Stephanie Shapiro

July 30, 2006
Software, Web sites can create music tailored to your desired workout rate

Way back when iPods were a twinkle in Steve Jobs' eye, gym rats sweated to fast-paced music, but generally couldn't tell you how many beats per minute their favorite workout tunes actually contained.

In those formative years of fitness training, a song's actual tempo was known to your instructor alone, says Alyssa Shaffer, fitness director of Fitness magazine.

"The shift has been going from instructor-based routines, to the whole iPod revolution. Now you have the ability to create your own playlist and your own intensity mixes," she says.





Seniors Shouldn't Fear Exercise, Study Finds

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, July 29, 2006 - 03:19 PM 1097 Reads
Training

Seniors Shouldn't Fear Exercise, Study Finds

July 28, 2006

A Johns Hopkins study should ease older adults' concern that exercise could harm their hearts, even if they have mild high blood pressure.

Results of the research on 104 men and women age 55 to 75 showed that a moderate program of physical exertion had no ill effects on the heart's ability to pump blood nor does it produce a harmful increase in heart size.

In this study, "moderate" translated to sustained exercise for about an hour, three times a week. Researchers say people's concerns stem from the fact that during each workout, blood pressure can on average rise from 40 millimeters to 60 millimeters of mercury.





Hot weather and humidity make running a scary task

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 11:03 AM 2053 Reads
Training




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Packing energy for the long haul

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 10:57 PM 1343 Reads
Training




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Too much isn't a good thing Overtraining is counterproductive -- and sometimes career-ending

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, July 25, 2006 - 03:28 PM 1073 Reads
Training

Too much isn't a good thing Overtraining is counterproductive -- and sometimes career-ending

By Jack Cox

July 25, 2006

Overtraining never was an issue for Roger Bannister, who broke the 4-minute-mile mark in 1954 despite a medical-school schedule so tight he could run only about 30 minutes a day.

Nor was it a concern for Gunder Hagg, the Swedish runner who had set the previous mile record in 1945 after training mostly on his lunch hours as a firefighter. But over the past few decades, athletes in various sports have increasingly stepped up the volume and intensity of their workouts -- to the point where many run the risk of burning out.





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Guide for the rookie runner / On your foot

Posted by: pshields on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 01:35 PM 916 Reads
Training

Guide for the rookie runner / On your foot

By Yossi Melman

If you have had your physical, been declared fit to train and are dying to get started, be just a little more patient. Next week, we'll get to the real thing - the training program. Today we will discuss one more precondition, one that is no less important than the physical fitness examination: your shoes. You might say: What's the big deal, any sports shoe is adequate. Wrong. I recommend that you learn from my sad experience.

When I started running 12 years ago, I thought that wearing sneakers was enough. I ran in my old sneakers a few times until sharp foot pains forced me to stop. My toenails had turned black and I was forced to see a doctor. It happened in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Lucky for me, the doctor I went to see happened to be a marathon runner.





More than just one foot in front of the other

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, July 23, 2006 - 09:49 AM 991 Reads
Training




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Faster 5Ks on 40 miles per week

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, July 22, 2006 - 09:25 AM 3195 Reads
Training

Faster 5Ks on 40 miles per week

By: David Holt

July 20, 2006

Balance your 5K training while using all of your energy systems, and avoid flogging yourself to fatigue.

Want to get injured' It takes no skill to train yourself into the ground with overtraining: just go out and run your hardest every day.

If your goal is to race fast though, while avoiding injury, you should run quite slowly most days (60 to 70 percent of maximum heartrate or max HR). You should only feel slightly fatigued after any speed session; you should not be achy all over.





Pre-race meal can lessen chance of sub-par performance

Posted by: pshields on Friday, July 21, 2006 - 02:20 PM 1156 Reads
Training

Pre-race meal can lessen chance of sub-par performance

July 21, 2006

You have heard it many times before: "The most important meal of the day is breakfast."

Never more so than if it is a day you plan on running a race or a hard workout.

Everyone seems to know what should be eaten in the days leading up to a marathon. But if you are running the local 2- or 5-mile race do you do the same thing?

It wouldn't be a bad idea to eat somewhat like a marathon runner in the days before your race. Because a marathon runner is essentially building fuel stores, or in other words, storing glycogen, this could be beneficial to you as well.

The morning of the race can be tricky as most runners are clueless as to what should be eaten. Just as important is the time the meal should be eaten.





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