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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Race day: How to prepare for a marathon

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, October 26, 2006 - 03:02 PM 1054 Reads
Training




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The Marathon - pushing the limits of human performance

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, October 25, 2006 - 02:54 PM 938 Reads
Training




Less time, more energy can whip flab into fab

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, October 24, 2006 - 02:43 PM 1073 Reads
Training

Less time, more energy can whip flab into fab

Jeannine Stein

October 24, 2006
Whether a workout is short and intense or long and moderate, your body benefits.

When it comes to cardio exercise, less appears to be more.

That's the conclusion of researchers who discovered that extremely short bouts of high-intensity exercise produce the same improvements in muscle health as longer, more moderately paced workout sessions.

In the two-week study, published in The Journal of Physiology, 16 college-age men, all recreational exercisers, were asked to exercise on stationary bicycles three times a week. One group cycled for 30 seconds all-out, followed by four minutes of recovery, which means pedaling at a slower speed while keeping the heart rate somewhat elevated. They repeated that several times for a total of about 20 minutes a day. The other group cycled at a moderate pace for 90 to 120 minutes a day.





Improper marathon training can trip you up

Posted by: pshields on Monday, October 23, 2006 - 11:47 PM 912 Reads
Training

Improper marathon training can trip you up

October 23, 2006

By BOB CONDOR

Temptation cuts across all parts of a healthy lifestyle.

Chocolate bars come to mind. So does an extra afternoon coffee or playing hooky to make an appointment with your massage therapist.

For Kim Frye, her temptation is running in an upcoming marathon even if she hasn't properly trained. Here's a recent e-mail from Frye, who reads the Living Well column online at www.seattlepi.com:





Runner's tips: Get good shoes, layer your clothes and find a running buddy

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, October 22, 2006 - 03:31 PM 1215 Reads
Training

Runner's tips: Get good shoes, layer your clothes and find a running buddy

BY JAIME INGLE

Mike Toolen, 61, has been on the run for more than 20 years.

Running marathons that is.

The owner of Running Start in Shiloh has completed 19 marathons.

At his store, he helps runners find the right shoes and helps them train for the 26.2- mile test of endurance.

A former civilian computer specialist with the U.S. Department of the Army, Mike is divorced and has five grown sons and six grandchildren. He opened Running Start in Fairview Heights in 1999 and relocated to Shiloh 18 months ago. Today Mike and his friends are in the Windy City running the Chicago marathon.





Have fun, get fit with barefoot running

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, October 21, 2006 - 02:59 PM 1031 Reads
Training

Have fun, get fit with barefoot running

By Lisa Roberts

Oct. 20, 2006

The shoe fits, but Brett Williams decided not to wear it. After his new running shoes caused sore knees, this 29-year-old Salt Lake City man went au naturel. In June, he ran barefoot in his first marathon. His feat, if you will, created national buzz when a photo of his road-blackened soles appeared in the Wall Street Journal.

Barefoot running has been the practice of some of the world's best runners, including Abebe Bikila of Ethiopia, who won the 1960 Olympics marathon without shoes. And though most of the world's runners continue to lace up, barefoot ideology might be hitting its stride.





A runner's perils

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 03:01 PM 886 Reads
Training

A runner's perils

October 14, 2006

Heart attacks, hyponatremia and hitting the wall

One kilometre Heart rate has risen to race level, 75-80% of maximum, about 140 beats per minute for an average, 40-year-old male runner. Competitive runners push their hearts further, approaching the line between aerobic and anaerobic activity. All runners need to keep a steady pace, saving some for a sprint at the end.





What Factor Is Most Important For Marathon Success

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, October 18, 2006 - 02:34 PM 3764 Reads
Training

What Factor Is Most Important For Marathon Success

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

October 18, 2006
Cohort Studies Don't Shed Much Light on the Matter

Since the 1970s, exercise scientists have been keenly interested in discovering the elements of training and fitness which are most important for marathon success. The earliest studies focused on ingredients such as maximal aerobic capacity, weekly training mileage, number of miles per workout, training intensity (speed), running economy, age, height, and weight, attempting to link these variables with marathon finishing time.





The Advantages of Running Long

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 02:06 PM 1450 Reads
Training

The Advantages of Running Long

By Owen Anderson, Ph. D.

September 27, 2006 
Thorsten Veblen Might Struggle to Find Them

As a scientist, coach, and runner, one of my primary puzzlements has been why so many runners prefer high-mileage training over lower-volume, higher-quality work.

True, such a preference does reflect a Midwestern sensibility, with which I can certainly empathize, being a corn-fed lad from Iowa myself. We Midwesterners tend to believe that anything of value can only be earned as a result of good, hard work. In fact, we often think that valuable things can be acquired solely through lots and lots of demanding, repetitive travail. Carrying this view of the world into our running lives, we tend to pound the pavement as though we were carrying out hundreds of long-division problems in sixth-grade math class. Could we run a terrific 10K or masterful marathon without massacring our legs with tons of miles' Golly, no!

But what about you runners who live in the East, the South, and the West (and, heaven forbid, in Europe, Australia, Africa, Asia, or Zanzibar)' What is your excuse'





The new opiate of the middle-class masses

Posted by: pshields on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 08:31 AM 1053 Reads
Training

The new opiate of the middle-class masses

Tom Blackwell

October 14, 2006

As the popularity of marathon running balloons, the fitness rate of many participants is declining. At least one doctor wonders whether the punishing 42-kilometre endurance ordeal has become too popular

It generates litres of sweat, holds the heart at near maximum capacity for hours on end and inflicts microscopic -- though painful -- muscle damage, sometimes lasting for weeks.

Running a marathon is clearly no lark. Yet for a growing chunk of Canada's middle-aged masses, it has become the physical challenge that must be met. A surprising number have even given their lives in the quest for that 42.2-kilometre grail.





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