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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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VO2 What?

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 01:03 PM 1148 Reads
Training

VO2 What?

November 29, 2006

Cameron Chesnut

Editors Note- More and more athletes are using power meters, heart rate monitors, and even professional coaches these days. One of the first things any athlete should do before implementing any of these devices into their training is to have themselves physiologically tested to discover their individual performance parameters. VO2 max is one of the terms you will most definitely hear during any physical testing, but, just what is VO2 max? Cameron Chesnut takes on the challenge of answering that question.  Enjoy.





Go easy on use of caffeine, alcohol

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 01:46 PM 1225 Reads
Training

Go easy on use of caffeine, alcohol

November 28, 2006

JACKIE MIRON

Runners are known to practice healthy habits but are not strangers to caffeine and an occasional alcoholic drink. Questions to this column are often related to the positives and negatives of consuming caffeine and alcohol in a runner's diet, especially before or after racing.

There has been a lot of research conducted on the effect of caffeine on athletes in general training and in competition. In simulated tests, caffeine has shown to improve performance around one to two percent. However, the tests have rarely been done during an actual race or event. Additionally, caffeine stimulates the central nervous system, which helps athletes feel alert and concentrate better. It increases adrenaline, which might make the workout or race feel easier.





Keep on running - whatever!

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 09:57 PM 1058 Reads
Training

Keep on running - whatever!

Mike Searle

Running is currently one of the most popular exercise activities, both purely recreationally and for competition and this resurgence is due in part to hugely successful race series such as the Race for Life 5K and similar 10K events nationwide. Locally, running has never been more popular and races in the region right up to the half marathon distance are frequently sold out in record time; demonstrating that running really is top of the charts. That should really come as no surprise because running is an extremely accessible activity, it's cheap and it brings massive health and fitness benefits, even if you have been inactive for a long time. However, with the nights well and truly drawing in, it can be easy to let your regular training routine slip when everything outside is black and cold but that will result in considerable fitness losses which will take time to pull back in the Spring. So what's the best way to maintain your motivation this winter so that when the clocks change again you're ready to move up or target a race? Well, this week, I'm concentrating on a range of training strategies to help you 'keep on running - whatever'.





Tackling knee issues

Posted by: pshields on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 02:00 PM 1210 Reads
Training

Tackling knee issues

November 27, 2006

Tom DeSchriver

The last few columns I've answered questions from peers here at the Record. Most think I'm crazy for attempting to run 26 miles, but that hasn't stopped them from asking some good questions about it.

Today's comes from Greg Back in Creative Services.

Greg just started running recently and after a few days on the road his knees swelled up. He switched to a Nordic Track ski machine to build up his stamina, hoping to cut down on the impact to his knees. He's up to about four miles in 35 minutes.

His question is: When do you think I'll be ready to try running again?





Recording your training helps you stay on track

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 09:57 PM 1235 Reads
Training

Recording your training helps you stay on track

Bob Boyd

Keeping track of your workouts can be extremely helpful and motivating. What often separates those who talk about doing something from those who actually accomplish their goal is having a plan. If you really want to increase your odds of success, you need regular feedback on your progress. (Subliminal note: just write it down.)





'Miles make champions'

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 02:44 PM 1133 Reads
Training

'Miles make champions'

John Walsh

In last week's article we established that the pace for easy and long runs should be 65-75 per cent of your maximum heart rate (HRmax).

When many runners begin using heart rate monitors (HRMs), they quickly complain that the pace is "too slow". That the pace is often much slower than what they thought was their easy pace is probably true. It just means that their "easy" was not as easy as it should have been.

Many go so far as to even stop using the HRM, somehow arguing that the numbers "don't make sense" or that the numbers don't work for them and that they are somehow different from other runners.





The final stretch

Posted by: pshields on Friday, November 24, 2006 - 04:04 AM 1262 Reads
Training

The final stretch

Nerves high, training miles adding up for 1st-time marathoners

Mary Beth Faller
Nov. 21, 2006

The big day is less than two months away. For first-timers training for the P.F. Chang's Rock 'n' Roll Arizona Marathon on Jan. 14, this is crunch time. The miles are adding up, and achy runners are starting to get nervous.

The weekly long run is the centerpiece of every good training program, and with the race less than eight weeks away, runners should be pounding out about 16 miles this weekend. Total weekly mileage is 26 to 30 miles right now.

"The injuries that most runners experience now are the overuse injuries, where the repetition of going long is compounded by the fact that they've been training for 10 or 12 weeks," says Brian Collins, founder of the 1st Marathon training program. "Things get irritated and swell."





Sometimes you've just got to go all-out.

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, November 23, 2006 - 04:09 PM 1087 Reads
Training

Sometimes you've just got to go all-out.

By John Bingham

There have been a couple of times in my running career when I've needed to see a physical therapist. In each case, it was because I had done something stupid. (Who knew the rule against doubling your mileage in a single week applied to me, too?) And on each visit, the therapist was kind enough not to remind me of my stupidity.

While I try my best these days to avoid the PT's office, I find myself becoming more and more committed to a different type of physical therapy--a much more intimate kind. The kind that only athletes understand. I'm talking about the heart-pounding, lung-screaming, mind-bending therapy of all-out effort.

Yes, this is still the Penguin talking. And I certainly haven't given up on the slow-but-steady, joy-of-the-journey running philosophy that I've embraced for so long. Instead, what I'm suggesting is intense effort as an adjunct to my steadfast waddling.





Learning From Losers

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, November 22, 2006 - 04:07 PM 1047 Reads
Training

Learning From Losers

By Liz Applegate Ph.D.

Most people who have lost weight (and kept it off) adopted these five habits. It'll be your loss if you adopt them, too.

When it comes to dieting, everyone wants to be a loser. But only 10 percent of people who manage to drop pounds also manage never to see them again. The good news is that as a runner, you already have a head start in joining this enviable club.

For the past dozen years, researchers Rena Wing, Ph.D., and James Hill, Ph.D., have meticulously tracked about 6,000 people who have met the minimum requirements to participate in their National Weight Control Registry: They must have lost at least 30 pounds and maintained that for at least a year. (The average is 70 pounds off and for six years.)





Build recovery into marathon training

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, November 22, 2006 - 01:16 AM 1033 Reads
Training




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