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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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Final weeks mean fewer miles before marathon-Tapering is key to success.

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - 03:02 PM 2220 Reads
Training

Final weeks mean fewer miles before marathon-Tapering is key to success.

By Brom Hoban

January 23, 2007

One month out from the AT&T Austin Marathon, and it's time to assess your goals and focus in on the remaining training block.

This time period is critical to the success of your marathon, and some form of "taper" is highly recommended.

Many runners train as usual, barely cutting back on their running. They may even pull off a decent marathon. But the truth is, they would probably have run faster if they had not "trained through" the marathon.

There are countless stories of runners who, forced to lay off running completely for a few weeks due to injury, ended up running a personal best in the marathon. While this is not recommended, the best scenario lies somewhere in between.





Plan for variety in your running

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - 08:25 AM 853 Reads
Training

Plan for variety in your running

By: KEVIN ELLIS

23rd Jan 2007,

This week I will complete my discourse on running for beginners.

I wrote last week about the correct running form, posture, how to hold your hands and arms, and whether to land on your heels or run on you toes. Now for some advice on a proper training program.

I'm sure you have often heard that variety is the spice of life.

This may or may not be true, but variety is the bread and butter of a proper running program. It is also the key to improved speed and performance. Most recreational runners usually live with the same workout every day of their running life. While the majority of your running should remain in the realm of endurance training, the addition of building block speed and strength workouts interjects freshness into what could become a stale and boring routine. The main reason most new runners leave our sport is because it becomes boring to them.





The cold should not be deterrent

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, January 21, 2007 - 01:37 PM 980 Reads
Training




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From Beginner to World Champion in just 25 years

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, January 20, 2007 - 10:11 AM 2454 Reads
Training

From Beginner to World Champion in just 25 years

A profile of patience and persistence

I am a Texan living in Norway. Believe me, there is some contrast there. Then again Norway revels in contrast, so perhaps I fit in better than I imagine. The land here lurches up defiantly from the sea as solid rock, not sandy beaches. In winter, parts of this very northern land do not see the sun for months. In Summer, the sun never sets. In the harbor 1/2 mile from my house, million dollar designer sailboats share space with wooden vessels built using methods that haven't changed in 500 years. Perhaps the biggest contrast of all is this: oil money has made Norway a rich and progressive nation, yet much of this wealth is used to hold on tenaciously to traditional ways of life. Not the least of these traditions is a reverence and respect for endurance, and the athletes who demonstrate it. This is a land where the popularity of distance running, cross country skiing, orienteering, and cycling are merely manifestations of a culture that still prizes substance over style, and respects stamina more than speed.





Uncasville runner begins training for Boston Marathon

Posted by: pshields on Friday, January 19, 2007 - 01:04 PM 929 Reads
Training

Uncasville runner begins training for Boston Marathon

By DON SIKORSKI

Kevin Gallerani believes that after many years of trial and error, he has finally derived the ideal marathon training plan. Unfortunately for Gallerani, just when he thought he had found all the answers, Father Time has changed the questions.

The 51-year-old Uncasville resident is a longtime runner with more than 35 marathon finishes to his credit. He has run the prestigious Boston Marathon 20 times, finishing as fast as 2:50:13. He has a personal-best marathon time of 2:44:14 in the 1984 East Lyme Marathon. And he teaches a marathon training class, conducted at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital each fall, designed to assist runners reach their marathon running goals.

So when we decided to track the progress of an area runner training for this year's Boston Marathon, Gallerani was the ideal test subject.





Training For Your First Half Marathon or Marathon

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, January 18, 2007 - 01:20 PM 2253 Reads
Training




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Keep the long run in mind

Posted by: pshields on Wednesday, January 17, 2007 - 03:01 PM 925 Reads
Training

Keep the long run in mind

Jill Barker

Monday, January 15, 2007
Not an impossible goal for most runners

If you've balked at running a marathon in the past, chances are you're daunted by the challenge. Yet there are very few runners who, with the proper training, lack the legs to cross the finish line.

Still doubt you can get it done? Take a look at the following reasons why runners are hesitant to give marathons a try, and read why you may be in better shape to run one than you think.





Eating for performance (part 3)

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, January 16, 2007 - 04:10 AM 1165 Reads
Training

Eating for performance (part 3)

John Walsh

Last week, I discussed how most athletes believe they have the whole 24 hours between workouts in which to re-fuel their muscles .

I also stated that the latest sports research shows that this is not so. In actual time, athletes only have about 45 minutes after a hard workout to optimally replenish their stores of muscle glycogen (the stored form of carbohydrate). After that period of time, the refuelling process tapers off drastically.

Let's consider all the things we are trying to achieve when we re-fuel post-workout:





Eating for performance (part 2)

Posted by: pshields on Monday, January 15, 2007 - 06:18 PM 1285 Reads
Training

Eating for performance (part 2)

John Walsh

Despite writing last week that fat should make up approximately 30 per cent of a runner's diet, make no mistake, carbohydrate is the preferred fuel for distance runners.

Carbohydrate can be used more efficiently for ATP (energy) production and is simply easier to convert to energy than fat or protein.

The reason our bodies do not rely solely on carbohydrate for energy is due to our poor ability to store great quantities of this fuel source. We can store some carbohydrate as glycogen in our muscles and liver, and as glucose in our blood, the total of which will last us for less than two hours of very easy running.

But as we run faster and faster, the glycogen lasts less and less time. Not even the Olympic champion can store enough to run a full marathon solely on carbohydrate.





Eating for performance (part 1)

Posted by: pshields on Monday, January 15, 2007 - 07:19 AM 1316 Reads
Training

Eating for performance (part 1)

John Walsh

Fat has got a bad reputation. It appears to be fully deserved, but isn't.

Many of us can reach down to our waists (or thighs, in the case of women), and grab a handful of body-fat. We get confused because since this stuff is referred to as body-fat, it implies that it got there through eating too much dietary fat.

In response, and determined to do something about it, many people promptly decide to cut down on eating fat in their diet. Which, if you are a distance runner, may not be a good idea.





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