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Topic: Training

The new items published under this topic are as follows.

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High-speed running tests are excellent predictors of marathon finishing time

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 04:01 AM 1224 Reads
Training

High-speed running tests are excellent predictors of marathon finishing time

Peak Performance

Owen Anderson

How can you predict your performance in a forthcoming marathon? And how can you measure improvements in your fitness if you are not racing regularly? The answer, dear reader, is to work out your 'critical velocity'! What's that? Another sophisticated performance variable to deal with - just when you were finally getting comfortable with the intricacies of vVO2max, tlimvVO2max, and lactate-threshold running speed?





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'No pain, no gain' holds true in running

Posted by: pshields on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 04:59 AM 1671 Reads
Training




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Improve your anaerobic threshold and VO2 max

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, November 20, 2003 - 03:54 AM 4669 Reads
Training

Improve your anaerobic threshold and VO2 max

David Holt
the Running Coach

Having just read a Runner's World article recommending a mere 3 minute warm up on the treadmill before increasing the gradient, I just had to use this up-coming extract from 10K & 5K Running Training & Racing to help you avoid Achilles tendon injuries and shin splints. The Achilles and shin muscles are renowned for needing long warm ups; they are two of the last running structures to be ready for quality running or for up hill running. Considering how essential they are for any running, even if you've just done 20 minutes on an elliptical trainer at a variety of gradients (after warming up of course) you'll still need to transition to running over 10 minutes, or one mile. Stroking the treadmill gently with your soft feet after 8 or 10 hours of desk work? 15 minutes or 2 miles is prudent before meeting your first hill challenge. Born more than 40 years ago? Add another 5 minutes to your warm up. All of you should do a couple of Achilles / calf stretches for each leg before upping the gradient.





What's the secret behind getting quick?

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 05:13 AM 1177 Reads
Training




Exercise expert offers fitness advice for new AF test

Posted by: pshields on Monday, November 17, 2003 - 04:08 AM 1121 Reads
Training

Exercise expert offers fitness advice for new AF test

by Anthony Cook
14th Medical Operations Squadron Exercise Physiologist

COLUMBUS AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. (AETCNS) -- Preparation is important for the new Air Force fitness assessment, especially the 1.5-mile run.

People who are just getting started with a running program should consider their current fitness and best starting point, exercise gear and workout options to best prepare them for the new assessments that begin in January.

Choose the correct starting point for yourself. If you aren't exercising regularly, ease into it. Walk and exercise regularly, such as 30 minutes three times a week.





GPS for runners keeps a good pace

Posted by: pshields on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 04:50 AM 1233 Reads
Training

GPS for runners keeps a good pace

By ANICK JESDANUN, Associated Press

November 10, 2003

NEW YORK - Along with packets of barely edible energy gels, I carried a training buddy while running this year's New York City Marathon: a satellite-assisted system for tracking my pace and mileage.

Over the past six months, I've logged nearly 600 miles in four states, Washington, D.C., France and the Netherlands, training with a Global Positioning System transceiver strapped around my arm and a companion digital watch around my wrist.

The Bodylink System, from Timex Corp., comes with a 5.3-ounce transceiver made by Garmin Ltd. The GPS unit tracks and calculates where I've been and sends an FM signal to the Timex watch, which displays how far I've gone and how fast - or slow, as may be the case.





Maintaining Training Adaptations During the Off-Season

Posted by: pshields on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 02:13 PM 1681 Reads
Training

Maintaining Training Adaptations During the Off-Season

Written by: Bryan C. Bergman, Ph.D.

Many athletes are taking a break from training in the current off-season, as the competitive calendar ends in October or November. Even the most elite athletes take a break from the rigors of in-season training. However, how long should that break be? Should athletes perform other types of activity to "stay in shape" during the break? How much of fitness will be lost if from a 1, 2 or 4-week break? These types of questions are vital for an off-season training program, as the current off-season is where next year's success will largely be determined. Take Jan Ullrich as an example - what does he do in the off-season? Clearly, not enough - and his performance every season is hampered by an unorganized off-season.





Long distances not for faint of heart

Posted by: pshields on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 04:14 PM 1125 Reads
Training




Older Athletes Test Their Stamina

Posted by: pshields on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 08:23 AM 1131 Reads
Training

Older Athletes Test Their Stamina

Wednesday November 12, 2003 6:31 PM

By MICHAEL VIRTANEN
Associated Press Writer

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (AP) - Rita Evans took a breather from her workout in the Union College pool and chuckled about her early experiences at national championships.

``Those Olympians, they wouldn't talk to me,'' said Evans, a relative upstart when she started racing at 75. Within a few years, she was winning national titles and they knew her name.

``When I got good, I got good fast,'' Evans said. ``I don't know if you'd call me an athlete, but I'm having an awful lot of fun.''

Ignoring conventional wisdom that aging ends your playing days, in the past few decades more graying athletes like the slender 84-year-old Evans are competing. Research confirms clear health advantages over non-athletes, though recent data show similar rates of individual physical decline.





Common Myths About Women & Weights

Posted by: pshields on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - 04:19 AM 990 Reads
Training

Common Myths About Women & Weights

A "Guest Pose" Article by Krista Scott-Dixon

You don't have to go far in the average gym to find someone willing to give you bad information. People are full of ideas and advice about women and weights. The other day I heard the most ludicrous thing yet: that cardio work was bad for you because it built muscle that pushed the fat out farther. Yep, I guess that's why marathon runners are all so obese---duh. Anyway I've compiled a list of some of the most common myths floating around like the alligator in the sewer stories. The difference is, of course, that there really ARE alligators in the sewer. And snakes that pop out of your toilet, heh heh.





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